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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, looking to upgrade wheels possibly, and would like to get 19x18.5” wheels… I’m concerned about wheel/tire fitting without butting up against suspension/struts or rubbing/turning issues… Ideally I could fit a 245/45/19 tire to have a more substantial sidewall/width but in calculating it on a comparison seems to be a bit bigger than the stock 18’s and 19’s available through VW.. I know it will throw the speedometer off a bit not a huge concern… does anyone have experience here? Would a 245/45/19 tire fit ok on a Taos S 4motion? If not, maybe a 235/45/19? I’m a newbie when it comes to this..

Also, how does it work w digital TPMS (tire pressure sensors…) is that an issue? Can a shop install that in aftermarket wheels/tires… might be difficult if they’re assembled/balanced and shipped from an online retailer like tire rack, no? thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
tpms doesnt matter in your case. search for the tpms thread on here for more details
Awesome, makes a lot of sense and sounds nice and simple, phew.

Now if someone can tell me if I’m being neurotic about tire sizing or if it will be a close fit that would be great. Also, my Taos is parked in the municipal garage right now so I don’t have access.. maybe someone can measure the wheel well width for me? That would help? Google searching coming up short.
 

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225/45 R19 92H

I need to ask why upgrade to such large rims? Or why you want to do it?

I, personally, don't like how on high trims force the large rims. Highline (SEL) includes 18". This in turn means they're more susceptible to pothole damage, home more expensive tires (and or limited tire choice) and of course, cost more to replace.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
225/45 R19 92H

I need to ask why upgrade to such large rims? Or why you want to do it?

I, personally, don't like how on high trims force the large rims. Highline (SEL) includes 19". This in turn means they're more susceptible to pothole damage, home more expensive tires (and or limited tire choice) and of course, cost more to replace.
Purely cosmetic reasons, I just like the style of a nice sizable black wheel on a black SUV. The stock 17” on my S are nice but I just like the style. Understand it’s not really advantageous in any way to do so..
 

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measuring the wheel well wont answer any question. you have to consider clearance when front wheels are turned to 1/2 and full position and if you go over bumps and the suspension fully compresses. (3 dimensional considerations).

if the overall size fo the tire matches factory then you'll be OK for sure. there are many combinations that are close when you do the math between rims and tire profile. additional tire width requires more clearance when turning front wheels due to wider tread. a wider tread can also start to hit the car when suspension is compressed. threre a lot of important stuff behind the tires that isn't supposed to come in contact with things.

even with the negatives Slavic mentions, the lower profile tires have better handling and harsher ride because of less flex. all depends on what you are after.

people that put 21"s on pickup trucks clearly dont use them as trucks. they'd hit the rims all the time if they did. my truck has 16" /70 o them and in that case the extra sidewall is very good. depending on how you use the taos, the same applies. the 19" are fine for us becuase we take the truck into more serious places.

tire size math is very easy to find the overall similar width and diameter with different rim/tire combinations.
 

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Ultimately its what YOU like and prefer, as I would do with decorating the exterior with themed decals. :geek:

Like that King's Red with black stripes and flashes. But VW themed, as example.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
measuring the wheel well wont answer any question. you have to consider clearance when front wheels are turned to 1/2 and full position and if you go over bumps and the suspension fully compresses. (3 dimensional considerations).

if the overall size fo the tire matches factory then you'll be OK for sure. there are many combinations that are close when you do the math between rims and tire profile. additional tire width requires more clearance when turning front wheels due to wider tread. a wider tread can also start to hit the car when suspension is compressed. threre a lot of important stuff behind the tires that isn't supposed to come in contact with things.

even with the negatives Slavic mentions, the lower profile tires have better handling and harsher ride because of less flex. all depends on what you are after.

people that put 21"s on pickup trucks clearly dont use them as trucks. they'd hit the rims all the time if they did. my truck has 16" /70 o them and in that case the extra sidewall is very good. depending on how you use the taos, the same applies. the 19" are fine for us becuase we take the truck into more serious places.

tire size math is very easy to find the overall similar width and diameter with different rim/tire combinations.
Thanks for this. Makes perfect sense. What is the best method here in this case? Talk to experts or people that know their stuff and hope it’s ok? 245/45/19 is not TOO much bigger than OEM 225/45/19 but it is bigger and certainly on the threshold of being too much..
 

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Don't forget to take wheel offset into consideration. The stock offset is 45mm I think, but if you went a lot wider than stock you might have to go with a lower offset so the wheel sits further out - which will create its own set of handling issues if you go too far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Don't forget to take wheel offset into consideration. The stock offset is 45mm I think, but if you went a lot wider than stock you might have to go with a lower offset so the wheel sits further out - which will create its own set of handling issues if you go too far.
Good point. Who knew new wheels would be so complicated
 

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some states, its illigal to have the tires extend past the fender well. alerting the offsets will impact this too. lucky my state does not have that law :)

more wheel offset increase also increases the chance to hit the fender liner. it swings in a larger arc when turning.

wider tires has +/- to consider also. they look cool and have higher dry traction but they have more surface area for hyrdoplaning too. muddy conditions, narrower tires are better. Wider also seems to be worse for snow but that might not be as clear. narrower tires have more pressure to melt the snow under the tires, which increases the slip. (this is how ice skates work). narrower has lower friciton.

anyway, its just a bunch of stuff for you to consider for your circumstance.
 

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So a quick ballpark calculation - if you went to a 35mm offset (I don't think I would go lower), you gain 10mm clearance on the inside of the wheel. (All these numbers are approximate).
That means if you consider tire tread width only, you could fit a +20mm width tire and maintain clearance - so 225/50R18 -> 245/40R19 for AWD (FWD have 215/50R18 width but I don't know why).
245/40/19 is a tiny bit smaller diameter than stock for AWD, and a tiny bit larger than stock for FWD (can somebody confirm the FWD size is 215/50R18?). Not sure how much excess clearance there is for stock wheels/tires, but there may be a little extra room there.
Now, this would also mean the outside edge of the tread would be ~20mm further out. Whether this would start to rub on the fender at all is something to watch out for.

On to the wheels. The stock wheel is 7" width - at least on my AWD SE. We have 20mm(ish) to play with so we could probably add an inch to the wheel width. So you're looking at an 8Jx19 with the inner edge of the rim ~2.5mm further in than stock. This is probably safe. But the outer edge is ~22.5mm further out than stock. The wider rim will make the tire sit a little differently. I have no idea if that would help or hurt for possible fender rubbing.

If you are determined to go with a wider 19" rim, then I think the above is a good place to start. A 235/40R19 tire on a 7.5" rim would be more likely to not have issues. That would be just a hair smaller diameter than the FWD stock tire.

Some things to play with:-
Tire Size Calculator
Rim & Tire Size Calculator. Custom Offsets - Wheel-Size.com
 

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some states, its illigal to have the tires extend past the fender well. alerting the offsets will impact this too. lucky my state does not have that law :)

more wheel offset increase also increases the chance to hit the fender liner. it swings in a larger arc when turning.

wider tires has +/- to consider also. they look cool and have higher dry traction but they have more surface area for hyrdoplaning too. muddy conditions, narrower tires are better. Wider also seems to be worse for snow but that might not be as clear. narrower tires have more pressure to melt the snow under the tires, which increases the slip. (this is how ice skates work). narrower has lower friciton.

anyway, its just a bunch of stuff for you to consider for your circumstance.
Haha you beat my post by a couple of seconds!
I'm assuming (perhaps wrongly) that these wheels would not see snow. But yes, those are important considerations too.
 

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Ask tirerack. They will have the answer.

I don’t see 245 being an issue though as it’s only 0.8” wider than 225s, so in theory you can split the difference with o.4” inside and out. That won’t stick out, rub the arch or the well.
 

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Ask tirerack. They will have the answer.

I don’t see 245 being an issue though as it’s only 0.8” wider than 225s, so in theory you can split the difference with o.4” inside and out. That won’t stick out, rub the arch or the well.
A 255 with et 43 should just fit, 245 for sure. The main issue is clearance from the shocks/struts. If he was going to lower it, then he might need to worry about fender rub during suspension compression, but with 245 and ET in the range I said, it is unlikely that it would rub.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
So a quick ballpark calculation - if you went to a 35mm offset (I don't think I would go lower), you gain 10mm clearance on the inside of the wheel. (All these numbers are approximate).
That means if you consider tire tread width only, you could fit a +20mm width tire and maintain clearance - so 225/50R18 -> 245/40R19 for AWD (FWD have 215/50R18 width but I don't know why).
245/40/19 is a tiny bit smaller diameter than stock for AWD, and a tiny bit larger than stock for FWD (can somebody confirm the FWD size is 215/50R18?). Not sure how much excess clearance there is for stock wheels/tires, but there may be a little extra room there.
Now, this would also mean the outside edge of the tread would be ~20mm further out. Whether this would start to rub on the fender at all is something to watch out for.

On to the wheels. The stock wheel is 7" width - at least on my AWD SE. We have 20mm(ish) to play with so we could probably add an inch to the wheel width. So you're looking at an 8Jx19 with the inner edge of the rim ~2.5mm further in than stock. This is probably safe. But the outer edge is ~22.5mm further out than stock. The wider rim will make the tire sit a little differently. I have no idea if that would help or hurt for possible fender rubbing.

If you are determined to go with a wider 19" rim, then I think the above is a good place to start. A 235/40R19 tire on a 7.5" rim would be more likely to not have issues. That would be just a hair smaller diameter than the FWD stock tire.

Some things to play with:-
Tire Size Calculator
Rim & Tire Size Calculator. Custom Offsets - Wheel-Size.com
you rock thank you!
 

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Wheel Tire Car Land vehicle Vehicle


Guy on facebook is running these with 245/35/20s lowered on coilovers. I think the Atlas Crosssport wheels are 8" wide. He says no spacers and no rubbing at stock height. Slight rubbing on coilovers. Thought this may provide a frame of reference.
 
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