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Just got the 'official' notice for the fuel line recall on my 2022 Taos SE FWD. Got an appointment at my dealer for Friday, and when I arrived was told that there are no parts, nor do they have the tool needed to perform the recall. I have an upcoming trip to Calif. in three weeks. The dealer did not even offer to perform the inspection to see if the parts were needed. I really had hope that VW would have learned their lesson after the TDI issues of the past. Too bad, we really like the car ( once you get over the acceleration issue that happens upon a slow turn) but it may need to go.......
 

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Just got the 'official' notice for the fuel line recall on my 2022 Taos SE FWD. Got an appointment at my dealer for Friday, and when I arrived was told that there are no parts, nor do they have the tool needed to perform the recall. I have an upcoming trip to Calif. in three weeks. The dealer did not even offer to perform the inspection to see if the parts were needed. I really had hope that VW would have learned their lesson after the TDI issues of the past. Too bad, we really like the car ( once you get over the acceleration issue that happens upon a slow turn) but it may need to go.......
Dude I am in the same situation. They don’t have any parts no ETA. Nothing all they say is deal with it in a nice way. If they can’t fix your car within 30 days you may be eligible for a lemon law. Don’t do the buyback they pay enough and fees they may actually start doing their due diligence and having parts available before they release vehicles
 

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I am in the same boat - no tool and can not inspect. They had my car for 2 days saying the tool would be in and they still have not received it. Now I have to take it back again. Not a way to start out with a new car with 260 miles. Word of warning CALL and ask your dealership if they have tool to fix before scheduling a appointment.
 

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I am in the same boat - no tool and can not inspect. They had my car for 2 days saying the tool would be in and they still have not received it. Now I have to take it back again. Not a way to start out with a new car with 260 miles. Word of warning CALL and ask your dealership if they have tool to fix before scheduling a appointment.
Excellent advice, thanks. I have to call my dealer back next week to see if they have the tool yet.
Also, I wonder - if the line fails the test do they have a replacement available and can the original be refitted or is it ruined?
 

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Dude I am in the same situation. They don’t have any parts no ETA. Nothing all they say is deal with it in a nice way. If they can’t fix your car within 30 days you may be eligible for a lemon law. Don’t do the buyback they pay enough and fees they may actually start doing their due diligence and having parts available before they release vehicles
That isn’t how the lemon law works.

Recalls are actually exempt from the laws unless after the recall is performed the car has a problem that can’t be fixed within 3 tries.

This is a “potential” issue and no fires have been experienced in the wild. If it were a major danger vector, the recall would require the cars to be parked.

Think about how long it took (is still taking!) for the Takata airbag recall.

The Chevy Bolt recall is far worse and more dangerous than this Taos issue. And those cars are still on the road. Chevy is offering buyouts on a case by case basis, but mainly because the “fix” right now turns a 250mile car into a 150 mile car that you can’t charge overnight and can’t store in a garage, and the original recall failed to fix the issue after 9 months.
 

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That isn’t how the lemon law works.

Recalls are actually exempt from the laws unless after the recall is performed the car has a problem that can’t be fixed within 3 tries.

This is a “potential” issue and no fires have been experienced in the wild. If it were a major danger vector, the recall would require the cars to be parked.

Think about how long it took (is still taking!) for the Takata airbag recall.

The Chevy Bolt recall is far worse and more dangerous than this Taos issue. And those cars are still on the road. Chevy is offering buyouts on a case by case basis, but mainly because the “fix” right now turns a 250mile car into a 150 mile car that you can’t charge overnight and can’t store in a garage, and the original recall failed to fix the issue after 9 months.
Wow. You are right. It could be worse!!
 

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Has anyone actually experienced the Fuel Line separation and Leak?
yes I have. A few times actually. Initially when I got the car my dad instantly saw the leak from the car sitting in the driveway. Took it in and ended up getting the engine taken apart and replaced! That was 3 weeks after purchasing. Then when I got it back the car started stalling and shutting off at red lights and stop signs. Alerting me to manually restart the car all while it was in drive. Then it got worse and shut down multiple times while the car was actually moving. The scary thing is the shut down isnt quick, it turns off and starts slowing down and the brakes nor gas works. I sent it back to service ASAP and told themI didn’t want it anymore. Currently working on a buyback offer
 

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yes I have. A few times actually. Initially when I got the car my dad instantly saw the leak from the car sitting in the driveway. Took it in and ended up getting the engine taken apart and replaced! That was 3 weeks after purchasing. Then when I got it back the car started stalling and shutting off at red lights and stop signs. Alerting me to manually restart the car all while it was in drive. Then it got worse and shut down multiple times while the car was actually moving. The scary thing is the shut down isnt quick, it turns off and starts slowing down and the brakes nor gas works. I sent it back to service ASAP and told themI didn’t want it anymore. Currently working on a buyback offer
I was curious about how widespread the problem may be and how serious the consequences may have been when the leak occurred.
I can't imagine why your engine would have been replaced. We experienced the engine stopping when at a stop light or just stationary, but learned to turn off the foolish fuel saving "Start-Stop" feature
We got our FWD SE on Aug 01. On Aug 11, we had about 250 miles on it. My wife had picked up our 3 yr old grandson in the AM. That trip included 10 miles of highway driving. Later in the day I was dropping her off at work, pulled into a parking space and immediately smelled gas. Got out after shutting car off and saw a 3ft diameter puddle under the engine with a continuous drip from the engine compartment. Quickly got my grandson out of the car and called VW Roadside Assistance. They notified the local FD for safety reasons and arranged a tow to the nearest dealer. FD arrived, checked vehicle for any continuing leakage (it had stopped) and attended to the fuel on the ground. Dealer had the repair done and inspected by a VWUSA tech by the next afternoon. He had checked to ensure that the dimension of the fuel line, at the connection point was within specs and supervised the re-connection. Since the components were all within spec, the conclusion was that the connector had been insufficiently torqued at the factory.
Again, this happened on Aug 11. The recall by NHTSA was issued on Aug 20. I haven't been able to find any statistics showing the number and severity of these occurrences. We've received our notice from VW to bring car in for recall, so it will be have been double checked.
We are just very thankful that this didn't happen in the AM while my wife and grandson were on the highway, and that it did happen in the relative safety of a parking lot around the corner from the local FDHQ, and that the leak wasn't close enough to the exhaust manifold to ignite.
Best of Luck with whatever you end up with!
 

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I was curious about how widespread the problem may be and how serious the consequences may have been when the leak occurred.
I can't imagine why your engine would have been replaced. We experienced the engine stopping when at a stop light or just stationary, but learned to turn off the foolish fuel saving "Start-Stop" feature
We got our FWD SE on Aug 01. On Aug 11, we had about 250 miles on it. My wife had picked up our 3 yr old grandson in the AM. That trip included 10 miles of highway driving. Later in the day I was dropping her off at work, pulled into a parking space and immediately smelled gas. Got out after shutting car off and saw a 3ft diameter puddle under the engine with a continuous drip from the engine compartment. Quickly got my grandson out of the car and called VW Roadside Assistance. They notified the local FD for safety reasons and arranged a tow to the nearest dealer. FD arrived, checked vehicle for any continuing leakage (it had stopped) and attended to the fuel on the ground. Dealer had the repair done and inspected by a VWUSA tech by the next afternoon. He had checked to ensure that the dimension of the fuel line, at the connection point was within specs and supervised the re-connection. Since the components were all within spec, the conclusion was that the connector had been insufficiently torqued at the factory.
Again, this happened on Aug 11. The recall by NHTSA was issued on Aug 20. I haven't been able to find any statistics showing the number and severity of these occurrences. We've received our notice from VW to bring car in for recall, so it will be have been double checked.
We are just very thankful that this didn't happen in the AM while my wife and grandson were on the highway, and that it did happen in the relative safety of a parking lot around the corner from the local FDHQ, and that the leak wasn't close enough to the exhaust manifold to ignite.
Best of Luck with whatever you end up with!
I actually turn off the stat/stop feature every time I enter the car. I despise the thing. So each time the vehicle shut down was when the start/stop feature was disabled. When I had the leak they mentioned nothing of a connector fuel line. What they did mention was the leak was coming from the faulty engine. Their words. It was only after the replacement that the car started shutting down randomly.
 

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I actually turn off the stat/stop feature every time I enter the car. I despise the thing. So each time the vehicle shut down was when the start/stop feature was disabled. When I had the leak they mentioned nothing of a connector fuel line. What they did mention was the leak was coming from the faulty engine. Their words. It was only after the replacement that the car started shutting down randomly.
So you're saying that the shut-downs occurred when the Start/Stop was disabled? Did you have any shut-downs when enabled? Interesting.
 

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I was curious about how widespread the problem may be and how serious the consequences may have been when the leak occurred.
I can't imagine why your engine would have been replaced. We experienced the engine stopping when at a stop light or just stationary, but learned to turn off the foolish fuel saving "Start-Stop" feature
We got our FWD SE on Aug 01. On Aug 11, we had about 250 miles on it. My wife had picked up our 3 yr old grandson in the AM. That trip included 10 miles of highway driving. Later in the day I was dropping her off at work, pulled into a parking space and immediately smelled gas. Got out after shutting car off and saw a 3ft diameter puddle under the engine with a continuous drip from the engine compartment. Quickly got my grandson out of the car and called VW Roadside Assistance. They notified the local FD for safety reasons and arranged a tow to the nearest dealer. FD arrived, checked vehicle for any continuing leakage (it had stopped) and attended to the fuel on the ground. Dealer had the repair done and inspected by a VWUSA tech by the next afternoon. He had checked to ensure that the dimension of the fuel line, at the connection point was within specs and supervised the re-connection. Since the components were all within spec, the conclusion was that the connector had been insufficiently torqued at the factory.
Again, this happened on Aug 11. The recall by NHTSA was issued on Aug 20. I haven't been able to find any statistics showing the number and severity of these occurrences. We've received our notice from VW to bring car in for recall, so it will be have been double checked.
We are just very thankful that this didn't happen in the AM while my wife and grandson were on the highway, and that it did happen in the relative safety of a parking lot around the corner from the local FDHQ, and that the leak wasn't close enough to the exhaust manifold to ignite.
Best of Luck with whatever you end up with!
They are estimating 1.5% of vehicles.
RCLRPT-21V651-4104.PDF (nhtsa.gov)
 

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I actually turn off the stat/stop feature every time I enter the car. I despise the thing. So each time the vehicle shut down was when the start/stop feature was disabled. When I had the leak they mentioned nothing of a connector fuel line. What they did mention was the leak was coming from the faulty engine. Their words. It was only after the replacement that the car started shutting down randomly.
[/QU
I actually turn off the stat/stop feature every time I enter the car. I despise the thing. So each time the vehicle shut down was when the start/stop feature was disabled. When I had the leak they mentioned nothing of a connector fuel line. What they did mention was the leak was coming from the faulty engine. Their words. It was only after the replacement that the car started shutting down randomly.
Check out this link provided by CRVW (Thanks!) for details of causes and corrective measures. https://static.nhtsa.gov/odi/rcl/2021/RCLRPT-21V651-4104.PDF
 
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