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VW shared some insight on how they decided on the interior design for the Taos.

  • Interior designers chose an upscale approach for the brand’s entry SUV
  • “Two-layer” interior treatment gives the cockpit a wide, dynamic look
  • Standard two-tone seats lend a modern feel
Herndon, VA — To help the 2022 Taos succeed in the booming compact SUV market, Volkswagen’s design team strategically developed the interior to appeal to the youthful intended buyer base with modern shapes and colors and an upscale feel.

“The interior design of Taos reflects the simple yet modern shape of the sculpted exterior,” says Dmitry Panov, Interior Designer for the Taos. “There’s a clean and recognizable theme, which harkens to other models in the Volkswagen SUV family.”

Based on the MQB platform, the five-passenger Taos compact SUV slots into the Volkswagen lineup underneath the strong-selling Tiguan, offering a mix of performance and utility for younger buyers who want the substance of a larger SUV in a smaller package.

The designers gave the Taos a distinct style by creating two separate levels on the dashboard. The top level has a glossy décor element that surrounds functional elements like the air vents, the standard Volkswagen Digital Cockpit, and the MIB infotainment touchscreen, which is angled towards the driver for ease of operation and ergonomics. The lower level provides a soft-touch surface, which runs the width of the interior and continues through the door panels on each side surrounding the front passengers.

Distinctive two-tone seats are standard on the entry S level, and are available across the lineup. Seating materials range from cloth to a combination cloth and leatherette, as well as leather seating surfaces. The design team wanted to create a visual connection across all interior elements, so they used the same materials for seat covers and other soft décor parts.

“You can choose between a cool color scheme with neutral grey and black, or a warm color scheme where black is paired with a French roast,” says Clara Schober, Color & Trim Designer for the Taos. “Across the trim lines, we added contrast stitching for an additional visual pop.”

Available features give owners more ways to customize the Taos. A panoramic sunroof is available on SE and SEL trims, adding an airy feeling to the interior. On top-of-the-line SEL trims, 10-color ambient lighting is standard, as is the fully customizable Volkswagen Digital Cockpit with a 10.25-inch display.

Taos is expected to begin arriving in Volkswagen dealers in June.

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The two-layer treatment may make it look wider, but it puts the vents low, and doesn’t actually MAKE it wider. Also puts touchscreen further away from driver.

Form over function.
 

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Glossy isn’t the surface one would want for the top of dashboard. Hopefully someone wll be making a dash pad. Makes one wonder if VW did any sort of market research.
 

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Glossy isn’t the surface one would want for the top of dashboard. Hopefully someone wll be making a dash pad. Makes one wonder if VW did any sort of market research.
I don’t think it’s glossy. Looks matte. Just a glossy upturn on the trim. I hope.
 

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The two-layer treatment may make it look wider, but it puts the vents low, and doesn’t actually MAKE it wider. Also puts touchscreen further away from driver.

Form over function.
I currently own a 2018 Alltrack SE. One of the issues I've had with the infotainment screen is it sits too low. When I interact with it, I have to shift my eyes down to a level where it takes my attention away from the road ahead. There were a couple of times when I first owned the car where that attention focus change could have led to an accident. As such, I've had to adjust when and how I use the system. I think moving the infotainment screen up to a higher position is a big plus for the Taos. You won't have to switch the position of your eyes nearly as far down, thus reducing the distraction caused by interacting with the system. Also, having the vents placed a bit lower is a plus for where I like the direction of the air flow (more towards my torso vs. my face). While it might shift the touchscreen a small bit further away from the driver, it's easily compensated for with a slight seat adjustment if necessary. I'd think for most people, that's a non issue. Here's the Alltrack's interior. You can see that your eyes have to shift over and down in order to see the screen. With the Taos they only have to shift over to the right a bit. You can also see how the vents on the Alltrack are directed towards your face. While some people might like that, I find it a less than optimal angle.
 

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I currently own a 2018 Alltrack SE. One of the issues I've had with the infotainment screen is it sits too low. When I interact with it, I have to shift my eyes down to a level where it takes my attention away from the road ahead. There were a couple of times when I first owned the car where that attention focus change could have led to an accident. As such, I've had to adjust when and how I use the system. I think moving the infotainment screen up to a higher position is a big plus for the Taos. You won't have to switch the position of your eyes nearly as far down, thus reducing the distraction caused by interacting with the system. Also, having the vents placed a bit lower is a plus for where I like the direction of the air flow (more towards my torso vs. my face). While it might shift the touchscreen a small bit further away from the driver, it's easily compensated for with a slight seat adjustment if necessary. I'd think for most people, that's a non issue. Here's the Alltrack's interior. You can see that your eyes have to shift over and down in order to see the screen. With the Taos they only have to shift over to the right a bit. You can also see how the vents on the Alltrack are directed towards your face. While some people might like that, I find it a less than optimal angle.
To each his own. I have a 2017 Alltrack and I find it one of the most ergonomic cars I have ever owned. I do see what you mean about looking down, but I think no matter where it is, it will pull focus if you let it.
I find lower vents freeze my fingers. But also see your point about the vent being in your face if you hate that.
We shall see in person, but it looks like the Taos screen is more angled to the driver than the Tiguan. That gets washed out by the sun at certain angles. The Taos also has an eyebrow over the screen to help with glare, something the Tiguan lacks.
 

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To each his own. I have a 2017 Alltrack and I find it one of the most ergonomic cars I have ever owned. I do see what you mean about looking down, but I think no matter where it is, it will pull focus if you let it.
I find lower vents freeze my fingers. But also see your point about the vent being in your face if you hate that.
We shall see in person, but it looks like the Taos screen is more angled to the driver than the Tiguan. That gets washed out by the sun at certain angles. The Taos also has an eyebrow over the screen to help with glare, something the Tiguan lacks.
I actually really like my Alltrack - but my Wife had an extensive back surgery a couple of years ago, and the step in/out height is just too low and the seat height and thigh support is substandard. I also wish I had spent the extra money at the time to get an SEL at the time with it's additional safety features. Having said that, we've been looking at small CUVs to replace my Alltrack. I've test driven the Kia Seltos, Ford Bronco Sport (Badlands), Jeep Cherokee, and even a Mustang Mach E. Each vehicle has had advantages/disadvantages over the other, but so far, we both prefer the Bronco Sport the best. Big problem with it though - price and availability. So, I'm hoping to look at the Taos as soon as it's released, and make a final purchase (order) decision after that. Overall, it appears that an SEL Taos might have everything we're looking for, but we'll have to test drive one first. However, the AWD ID.4 is (supposedly) coming out by the end of the year, so I might wait for that.
In the meantime, I'm driving my Alltrack very sparingly (to keep the mileage down), and she's driving her old Acura RDX (which is also in need of replacing).
 

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I actually really like my Alltrack - but my Wife had an extensive back surgery a couple of years ago, and the step in/out height is just too low and the seat height and thigh support is substandard. I also wish I had spent the extra money at the time to get an SEL at the time with it's additional safety features. Having said that, we've been looking at small CUVs to replace my Alltrack. I've test driven the Kia Seltos, Ford Bronco Sport (Badlands), Jeep Cherokee, and even a Mustang Mach E. Each vehicle has had advantages/disadvantages over the other, but so far, we both prefer the Bronco Sport the best. Big problem with it though - price and availability. So, I'm hoping to look at the Taos as soon as it's released, and make a final purchase (order) decision after that. Overall, it appears that an SEL Taos might have everything we're looking for, but we'll have to test drive one first. However, the AWD ID.4 is (supposedly) coming out by the end of the year, so I might wait for that.
In the meantime, I'm driving my Alltrack very sparingly (to keep the mileage down), and she's driving her old Acura RDX (which is also in need of replacing).
I actually chose to lease a leftover 2017 SE with Driver package rather than the 2018 SEL because the SE w/package that year had the ACC, park assist, etc, and also the fender audio. Also the deal was great on it in February 2018.
 
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